Iligan, Mindanao (Philippines): Initial support to the Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) victims of the Marawi Siege

We are posting below examples of humanitarian situations and activities run by the Ranaw Disaster Response and Rehabilitation Center, (RDRRAC) in Iligan, since the beginning of the Marawi siege, May 23, 2017. RDRRAC is a member of the Multi-stakeholders Initiatives for Humanitarian Action Against Disasters (MiHands), which intervenes in many other localities of Mindanao.


Child longs to go back to school, home in Marawi

Aslimah hugs her aunt Sohra who fosters her family in Brgy. Sta. Elena, Iligan City.

Iligan City- As children in a village in Brgy. Sta. Elena walked pass her aunt’s house in their school uniforms, Aslimah, 10, longs for the day that she too would don on her uniform and go back to her school in Lilod Bliss, Marawi City.

She thinks about her teachers, her classmates and her friends every day. The last time she saw them was when the school year closed on March. She hopes that like her, they have been spared from the gunshots that were fired on that tragic day of May 23. She wonders if they have run to safety with their families and relatives so that she could see them again when it is safe to go back to their homes.

“I miss our home in Marawi. It was hit by gunshots when we left but I still want to go home”, she says.

She misses her city’s cold weather whenever the temperature in Iligan City spikes up. She hesitates to make friends and play with her new neighbours who mostly speak Bisaya, a language she was a stranger to. She feels alien in her new neighbourhood even though her Aunt Sohra makes her and her family welcome in her home.

When the classes were announced to start in June, she insisted not to attend school no matter how much her mother and her aunt goaded her to. She was afraid that she would find it difficult to connect to her classmates and teachers.

“Hindi kasi ako marunong magsalita ng Bisaya. Wala akong kilala doon (I don’t know how to speak Bisaya. I know no one there)”, she shares.

Besides, she has been sick with fever for days and her cough leaves her sleepless at nights. Her six siblings suffer from body pains from sleeping on the floor and have prickly heat rash. She worries most about her parents who both suffered from stroke. Her father still couldn’t speak clearly as an effect of the stroke he had a year ago.

For now, they only have their aunt, Sohra Hadji Abdullah to lean on. She was the one who called them up when she heard of the news of the attack. She prompted them to escape on May 24.

“Sabi ko, umalis na kayo dyan. Pabayaan niyo na yang mga gamit ninyo diyan. Ang importante makapunta na kayo dito (I told them to leave (Marawi City) at once. Leave your things behind. What’s important is that you could come here)”, Sohra says.

Sohra worries about her nephews and nieces when their parents are presently ill. The children already show signs of depression, Aslimah being sad and distant since the day they arrived in her house.

While hoping for the siege to be over soon, the future remains bleak for Aslimah’s family and home is far away.

Lyne Grace Vergara


Expecting Twins in Uncertain Realities

Aslimah M. Dimaampao, 29, is 8 months pregnant and is expecting twins on July. She and her husband, Jamil have 5 children and being displaced, she has been wrought with worry on what the coming days will be for them.

Since they fled from the siege in Marawi City, they have been staying with relatives and neighbors in the Maahad Iligan Al-Islamie, a madrasah or Arabic school in Brgy. Tubod, Iligan City. It had been days since but the memory of a reality that she wished was just a nightmare remained etched on her mind.

She remembered the loud hissing and booming sound of the first bomb that was dropped in their village in Marinaut, Marawi City. She saw how their house was among those which was hit and destroyed. Without a safe place to hide, they hid in their neighbor’s basement.

When the bombs kept on dropping, they prayed that it would soon be over. Their children were crying and though also scared, Aslimah and Jamil tried to soothe their fears. For five days they waited for the escape that they thought wouldn’t have come.

When they thought it was safe to come out, they joined the throng of people from their village and walked towards the capitol grounds where they were accommodated and fed. After a two-hour respite, they walked the five-kilometer distance to Saguiaran.

Heavily-pregnant and with children in tow, the trek was most difficult for Aslimah. So when they reached Saguiaran, they decided to hire a tricycle to take them to Iligan City. They were not able to rest until they reached their relatives and neighbors in the madrasah.

Despite being away from harm, their burden of what happened to them began to sink in when their children showed signs of trauma.

“Konting ingay lang, nanginginig na sila sa takot (They shook with fear when they hear even just a bit of noise)”, she said.

The sound of an electric fan seemed like a helicopter hovering and the children would cry and as a mother, Aslimah could only do so much for her children. But when a play session was facilitated by the psycho-social support team of Ranaw Disaster Response and Rehabilitation Assistance Center-MiHANDs among the displaced children, she was surprised to see her children smile and laugh as they draw, sing and play. She felt relieved watching their tension ease even for a bit.

As for herself, Aslimah feared that her body wasn’t coping well with their situation. Her muscles are in pain. The heat also makes her breathing difficult. Sometimes, her heart palpitates for no apparent reason. Her husband, Jamil’s body is also in pain because of the cramped sleeping area that the family had to share with others.

The situation was difficult to bear especially when the days towards her baby’s birth are shortening. They don’t have the money to sustain their food, let alone to buy clothes, diapers, feeding bottles and other infant needs.

When an RDRRAC-MiHands volunteer gave her and her husband an infant kit complete with baby diapers, towels, mittens, feeding bottles, soaps, shampoos and others, she was somehow relieved knowing that the least of her worries has been taken care of.

“Masaya talaga ako kasi wala kaming pera pambili pag nanganak na ako. Malaking tulong ito sa amin (I’m really happy because we don’t have the money to buy these when I give birth. This is quite a big help)”, she said.

However, she and her husband still worry about the day she gives birth because they could not afford the services of a doctor and the medicines that will be prescribed later. Worse, when she gave birth, the babies will endure the same situation as their family in the evacuation center where diseases are already spreading because of lack of water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

SGarangan


The Ties that M’ranao Comfort Food Bind

Food warriors and volunteers share a meal at the Art Relief Mobile Kitchen after a day of humanitarian work in Iligan City. (Photo: Matet Norbe)

When the food warriors of the Art Relief Mobile Kitchen (ARMK) arrived in Iligan City to feed the internally-displaced persons of the Marawi siege, they already had a plan in mind: to cook comfort food.

Wikipedia defines comfort food as food that provides a nostalgic or sentimental value to someone, and may be characterized by its high caloric nature, high carbohydrate level, or simple preparation. The nostalgia may be specific to an individual, or it may apply to a specific culture.

For the M’ranaos, the people from Marawi City, comfort food is any meal that is cooked with coconut milk, turmeric, sakurab (white scallions), ginger and chili. And for food warriors, Alex Baluyut, Edgar Aguilar and Marko Matillano, providing home-cooked comfort meals for the M’ranao survivors remains top priority. When typhoon Yolanda struck Tacloban City, they were the first on scene to set up a kitchen and provided hot meals for the survivors arriving at the Villamor Airbase in Pasay City in 2013.

Mr. Matillano, a graduate from Laney College Oakland, California, a street photographer and one of the first volunteers of ARMK saw how a home-cooked meal made a significant difference for the survivors who received inadequate food relief.

“The point of food is not just to nourish you or keep you alive. There’s a psychological post-traumatic element to it. When you feed someone a home-cooked meal, it is comforting, not just giving someone some calories to burn”, he said.

On its first day of feeding in Iligan City, ARMK and its food warriors cooked 400 pieces of pater, a traditional rice meal wrapped in banana leaves for the IDPs fostered in a madrasah in Brgy. Tubod. It continued cooking more M’ranao comfort food like badak which was jackfruit cooked in coconut milk, chicken with papar or grated coconut meat and other delicacies for IDPs in three more evacuation sites

Mr. Aguilar currently works in the office of Governor Al Francis C. Bichara of Albay, a province that has endured natural disasters such as typhoons and and volcanic eruptions. And as a psychology graduate, he wasn’t a stranger to the psychological effects of displacement. Whenever he sees displaced children, he remembered his childhood friend, Yayang, a little girl who evacuated to their neighborhood. She was tormented by the sound of bombs exploding and gunshots fired, of memories of war in Cotabato.

With Yayang and other displaced children of human-induced disasters in mind, he hoped that the siege would soon be over because displacement brings hardship to those who were forced to flee the warmth of their homes.

ARMK’s founder, Alex Baluyut, a photojournalist for 30 years was amazed at how far their advocacy has reached. It began as a one-man kitchen with a single burner and a pot. With fellow photojournalists and photographers and some of his artist friends, ARMK grew as a collective of volunteers that mobilized community kitchens to disaster-affected communities in Bicol, Arakan Valley, Samar, and Surigao. It also launched 30 feeding programs to impoverished places in different areas in the country.

He said that it was their first time to cater to Muslims and it was like going back to the basics because everything has to be prepared halal or in ways that are permissible to Islam. Christian and Muslim volunteers came together to prepare halal food. They helped in the chopping, cooking, packing and delivery of food. M’ranao volunteers offered comfort food recipes and also lifted the communication barriers in the distribution in the evacuation centers. Their driver, Sam, a M’ranao also acted as interpreter in the centers and in the market.

“I think that hot meals are important to build up morale, friendship and cultural ties”, Alex Baluyut said.

In its 10 days of feeding operations in Iligan City, ARMK became a microcosm of the popularly-diverse Mindanao where people of different socio-cultural backgrounds developed ties that armed conflict couldn’t sever.

As for Alex Baluyut, Edgar Aguilar and Marko Matillano, their bond since typhoon Yolanda grew stronger. Every day in the kitchen brought new lessons and learning. Mr. Aguilar fondly talked about learning how to cook palapa, a M’ranao appetizer made from pounding white scallions, ginger and chili together and sautéing them in cooking oil. He said that his family is also excited for him to cook them turmeric rice when he comes home. Meanwhile, Mr. Matillano said that palapa satisfied his fondness for spices and would always bring him to memories of Iligan City and the people he met and worked with.

Edgar Aguilar and Marko Matillano wrapped up their volunteering in the ARMK and left Iligan City for Manila on June 9. However, they continue telling stories and encouraging other people to help ARMK continue its feeding program with their fellow food warrior, Baluyut still in Iligan City and aiming to feed more IDPs in the coming days.

“For once do something with your life. Either you do volunteer or donate. But better volunteer, donating is just secondary. Do something realistic with your life; make a difference”, Edgar Aguilar urged.

SGarangan


IDP children, young adults draw, sing and play

Boys draw faces on their paper children cut-outs in one of the psychosocial activities in Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon. Photo: Matet Norbe

Iligan City- Close to 200 internally-displaced children and young adults of the Marawi siege took time to engage in psycho-social activities such as drawing, singing and playing in Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon on June 6.

The children were grouped into different age brackets and were given specific activities that encouraged self-reflection, creativity, imagination and social connection such as playing, singing and drawing.

Raidah Matabalao, a young psycho-social support facilitator hails from the same barangay and her family also fosters relatives that were displaced by the siege. She said that her skills which she was trained to support the Surigao earthquake survivors were challenged because of the number of IDPs in the barangay. Since May 23, they are already hosting more than 400 IDP families.

“Nalipay ko nga nakatabang ko sa pag guide sa ilaha nga maka express sa ilahang mga gibati kay naa gyud uban nga hilom ra. Pero kay magkaedad ra mi, makasulti gyud sila sa ilahang mga experience og mga ginahuna-huna ilabi na sa future nila (I’m glad that I helped guide them to express their feelings because there are still those who were silent. But because we are of the same age, they told me about their experiences and their thoughts about their future)”, she said

Almerah Malawi, 17, from Rorogagus Proper, Marawi City, took part in the activities. She said that while she was drawing on a paper, she was flooded by so many memories of home.

“Parang bumalik ako sa mga panahon na bata pa ako. Yong nagdo drawing lang. Masaya lang (I was brought back to my days as a child when I was just drawing and I was happy), she shared.

The activities were facilitated by the trained psycho-social support facilitators of the Ranaw Disaster Response and Rehabilitation Assistance Center (RDRRAC) and the Multi-Stakeholders Initiatives for Humanitarian Action against Disasters (MIHANDS) through the #DuyogMarawi solidarity initiative.

MNorbe


500 IDP families to receive relief goods, hygiene kits

Five hundred families displaced by the Marawi siege will receive a set of relief goods and hygiene kits on June 6.

The packed sets are estimated to provide for a family of at most 5 members. Each set contains 5 kilos rice, 3 pieces noodles, 2 cans sardines, 1/2 kilo monggo (mung beans), 1 kilo salt, 1/2 kilo sugar and 1 (25 grams) coffee. Hygiene kits comprise 2 bars laundry soap, 5 pieces toothbrush, 1 pack of sanitary napkin and 6 sachets of toothpaste.

The response was initiated by the #DuyogMarawi solidarity initiative led by the Ranaw Disaster Response and Rehabilitation Assistance Center (RDRRAC) and the Multi-stakeholders Initiatives for Humanitarian Action Against Disasters (MiHands).

Since May 27, the #DuyogMarawi initiative already provided initial support for the IDPs in Moneerah Integrated School and Toril Building in Bgry. Ubaldo Laya and in the Maahad Iligan Al-Islamie in Brgy. Tubod already received initial relief goods.

There was the relief distribution of sleeping mats, hygiene kits, blankets, and water jugs with water by a group of faculty and students of Mindanao State University-Marawi City. The Art Relief Mobile Kitchen also took part in the initiative by serving cooked meals for iftar or when Muslim IDPs break their fast at dusk.

Minda Blasabas of RDRRAC said that the IDPs to be catered to were less-served because of the concentration of relief distribution in identified evacuation centers by the Department of Social Welfare and Development in Brgy. Buru-un and Brgy. Ma. Cristina.

“Per our needs survey in these areas, we found out that they still lack the basic support for food, shelter, hygiene and even water sanitation. There are also issues concerning mental as well as physical health”, she said.

#DuyogMarawi continues its solidarity with psychosocial support and health services in the coming days.


Psychosocial support, alternative health services reach IDPs

A volunteer takes an IDP’s blood pressure at the relief operations set up in Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon, Iligan City on June 6.

The #DuyogMarawi solidarity initiative set up a 3-part relief operation with distribution of relief goods and hygiene kits, psychosocial support session and alternative health services for 355 internally-displaced families of the Marawi siege in Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon for their emotional and physical recovery on June 6.

They are mostly based in the homes of family, relatives and friends. Since their evacuation on May 23, they received less from the government as well as humanitarian organizations because of their distance from the identified evacuation centers in the barangays of Buru-un and Ma. Cristina.

The psychosocial support was given separately to adults, young adults and children by trained facilitators, some of whom had offered services to IDPs since the armed conflict in 2002 and succeeding armed conflicts in 2004 and 2008 and of natural disasters such as typhoon Sendong and Yolanda and the earthquake in Surigao City.

The IDPs also experienced ear acupressure and massage to relieve their stress, to lower their blood pressure, and to ease the trauma they experienced. Herbal medicines such as lagundi capsule, turmeric and malunggay food supplement and ointment will also be distributed to those who have cough, colds and skin rashes.

Gabriel Dimapingun, 59, an IDP from Bangon Pamping, Marawi City suffered from back pains due to sleeping on the floor in the house hosting their family. After a head and back massage by alternative health practitioners, he said it was the first time in days that he felt relaxed.

“Anim kami na pamilya na nasa isang bahay ng kapamilya namin dito. Siksikan talaga at di maiwasang manakit ang katawan. Ang mga maliliit na bata ay nilalagnat na rin (We are 6 families being hosted in our relative’s house here (Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon). It’s cramped so body pains are inevitable. The little children are already suffering from fever)”, he said.

#DuyogMarawi is led by the Ranaw Disaster Response and Rehabilitation Assistance Center (RDRRAC) and the Multi-stakeholders Initiatives for Humanitarian Action Against Disasters (MiHands).


Acupressure, detox relieve stress of displacement

An IDP enjoys a head massage from an alternative health practitioner at the Toril Building, Brgy. Ubaldo Laya, Iligan City.

Gabriel Dimapingun, 59, remembered how he and his family spent a sleepless night listening to gunshots fired when Marawi City was taken over by terrorists on May 23. They were numbed with fear of not knowing what the next days would bring them. The morning after, they decided to leave their homes in Bangon Pamping with 5 other families to their relatives’ home in Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon, Iligan City.

Fourteen days after their escape, the burden of displacement was already felt by his family.

“Anim kami na pamilya na nasa isang bahay ng kapamilya namin dito. Siksikan talaga at di maiwasang manakit ang katawan. Ang mga maliliit na bata ay nilalagnat na rin (We are 6 families being hosted in our relative’s house here (Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon). It’s cramped so body pains are inevitable. The little children are already suffering from fever)”, he said.

When the #DuyogMarawi solidarity initiative for Marawi siege survivors set up its health desk in Brgy. Upper Hinaplanon on June 5, Dimapingun and some members of his family lined up to get their health condition checked. He had back pains from sleeping on the floor in their host’s house.

After a head and back massage by alternative health practitioners, he said it was the first time in days that he felt relaxed.

In a 3-storey building in Brgy. Ubaldo Laya in Iligan City, there are at least 134 internally-displaced persons cramped in its rooms. There was no electricity and water and they had to share one toilet.

Melinda Gallego, head of #DuyogMarawi’s health committee reported that out of 65 patients served on June 7, 32 of them suffer from skin diseases because of hygiene issues. Patients mostly suffer from cough and colds, muscle pains and dizziness. Most of them were children.

“Nakatabang gyud ang acupressure labi na ang massage para makapalawala sa sakit sa ilahang mga kalawasan og makapa-relax og pakalma sa ilahang mga gibati (Acupressure through massage relieves body pains, relaxes and calms them)”, Gallego said.

Gallego also noted that the IDPs they served in Iligan City showed symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. (PTSD). With her experience of serving IDPs of typhoon Sendong, typhoon Pablo, typhoon Yolanda and the Mamasapano siege, she stressed the need to immediately address these issues so that they could recover emotionally.

“Sa acupressure, mapababa nato ang lebel sa stress sa tawo. Ang detox, makapakalma og makapabalik sa ilahang maayong paghuna-huna (Acupressure decreases a person’s level of stress. Detox calms the person and clears his mind)”, she said.

#DuyogMarawi is led by the Ranaw Disaster Response and Rehabilitation Assistance Center (RDRRAC) and the Multi-stakeholders Initiatives for Humanitarian Action Against Disasters (MiHands).

MNorbe


Madrasah is home for Marawi siege IDPs

The Maahad Iligan Al-Islamie, a madrasah in Bara-as, Tubod, Iligan City becomes a temporary home for 287 internally-displaced persons who escaped the Marawi siege from Brgy. Marinaut, Marawi City on May 23.

Rocaya Lomondot, the owner, opened the door to her two-storey Islamic school to the IDPs who were mostly her relatives.

“Marata sa ginawa o pakailay akn a dadn mga a gamit iran, daa langon, duwanyan siran. Closing ami pn imanto, na sa opening o sisii siran pn na ki extend if di siran pn madal (It is so painful to see them with almost nothing. It is school break right now, but if it’s time to open the school and if they’re still here, it would have to be extended)”, she said.

Ada, 27, a school teacher of Marinaut Elementary School in Marawi City was one of the IDPs who took refuge in the madrasah. She recalled how she, her family and relatives were stranded in their houses for four days after the first gunshots were heard. They reached Iligan City after walking for hours.

She shared that the children didn’t stop crying until they reached the madrasah. She observed signs of trauma even if they are already safe from the danger of the siege. The sound of chair being dragged on floor seemed like gunshots.

“Kahit nga yong sound ng electric fan kapag narinig ng mga bata, tumatago sila kasi feeling nila parang helicopter magri-release ng bomba (Even the sound of electric fan scares the children because they think that it was a helicopter that would release a bomb)”, she said.

With only 7 rooms, the madrasah has reached its full capacity to foster more IDPs. The water source is also far.

Saliha, another IDP in the madrasah said that the scarcity of water source is affecting their fasting and praying in the Ramadan.

“Sana mag donate ang gobyerno samin ng kahit unan, mga banig, kumot, plato at panglutuan para naman kahit kami na ang mag luto, mahirap pag suhor (I wish that the government would donate even just a pillow, sleeping mat, blanket, plates and cooking things so that we could be the one to just cook for ourselves. It is difficult to eat our pre-dawn meal)”, Saliha implored.

The #DuyogMarawi solidarity initiative led by the Ranaw Disaster Response and Rehabilitation Assistance Center (RDRRAC) identified the IDPs hosted in the Maahad Iligan Al-Islamie as partners. Since May 27, it already distributed empty boxes as temporary sleeping mats and blankets. It also facilitated relief distribution of sleeping mats, hygiene kits, blankets, and water jugs with water by a group of faculty and students of Mindanao State University-Marawi City. Halal meals cooked by the Art Relief Mobile Kitchen (ARMK) were also served to the IDPs in the madrasah.

SGarangan and WPerocho


Marawi siege survivors begin emotional recovery

Survivors learn some breathing exercises to release stress and anxieties in an emotional recovery session on May 27.

Ten survivors of the Marawi siege underwent an initial emotional recovery process guided by psycho-social support volunteers of the Ranaw Disaster and Rehabilitation Assistance Center in the barangay hall of Brgy. Saray, Iligan City on May 27.

The survivors are residents of Brgy. Saray, Iligan City who worked in Marawi City when the terror attacks of the Maute group happened on Tuesday. They relived the stories of how they were able to escape and how they are coping up.

Nino*, a driver in Amai Pakpak Hospital Medical Center which was one of the establishments taken over by the terrorists shared that he was transporting three patients to Iligan when the attacks started.

“Gi hold mi sa checkpoint nga gunit sa Maute. Pero kay kabalo ko magsulti og M’ranao, ilaha ra ming gipaagi (We were held by members of the Maute group at a checkpoint but because I know how to speak M’ranao, they just let us pass)”, he said.

Julito* and his son, Mark Jay*, construction workers were trapped and spent the night in the school which they were building.

“Wa gyud mi katulog niato sa sobrang kakulba. Pagkabuntag, nibaktas mi padulong sa duol nga checkpoint sa sundalo og didto na mi gipasakay og hauler padulong Iligan (We didn’t sleep because were were scared. When morning came, we hiked to the nearest checkpoint of soldiers where we rode a hauler to Iligan)”, he said.

They shared that they were fortunate to have fled safely from the clashes but some of their co-workers are still trapped in the city and waiting to be rescued.

Sarah, one of the psycho-social support facilitators from the Ranao Women and Children Resource Center, Inc. taught the survivors some breathing and meditating exercises after they shared their experiences. She said that the session was just one of the four sessions that RDRRAC will facilitate for the survivors in Saray for them to fully recover psychologically.

RDRRAC’s psycho-social component was established when armed conflict broke between government forces and the members of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) in Kolambugan in 2002. It offered services to survivors of succeeding armed conflicts in 2004 and 2008 and of natural disasters such as typhoon Sendong and Yolanda and the earthquake in Surigao City.

It will offer the same services to other Marawi siege survivors in evacuation centers and those who are home-based in the coming days.

*Full names were not disclosed for discretion.


Art Relief Mobile Kitchen cooks halal food for Marawi siege IDPs

The Art Relief Mobile Kitchen (ARMK) that has been cooking meals for disaster survivors since supertyphoon Yolanda set up its first halal kitchen in Iligan City to feed internally-displaced people of the Marawi siege on May 29.

It began as an advocacy of veteran photojournalist Alex Baluyut who worked with the Pahayagan Malaya in the Marcos era. With just a single burner and a pot, he cooked lugaw or porridge for Yolanda survivors arriving at the Villamor Airbase in Pasay City in 2013. In just two weeks, it garnered enough material, skill and equipment support and became a six-tent kitchen. It became popular not only with people taking part in the kitchen operations but also with those who were reached online.

Mark Matillano, a graduate from Laney College Oakland, California, a street photographer and one of the first volunteers of ARMK saw how a home-cooked meal made a significant difference for the survivors who received inadequate food relief.

“The point of food is not just to nourish you or keep you alive. There’s a psychological post-traumatic element to it. When you feed someone a home-cooked meal, it is comforting, not just giving someone some calories to burn”, Matillano said.

With fellow photojournalists and photographers and some of his artist friends, ARMK grew as a collective of volunteers that mobilized community kitchens to disaster-affected communities in Bicol, Arakan Valley, Samar, and Surigao. It also launched 30 feeding programs to impoverished places in different areas in the country.

ARMK is set to serve at least 1,000 meals for displaced Marawi residents in partnership with the Ranaw Disaster and Rehabilitation Assistance Center (RDRRAC), a humanitarian organization catering to IDPs since 2000. Its halal kitchen prepares pater, a traditional food wrapped banana leaves for at least 300 people who will break their fast with a healthy meal.

Baluyut shared that it was their first time to set up a halal kitchen because the survivors are mostly Muslims. He said that they had to buy new cooking materials and ensure that food items and preparation are halal.

“I like to cook. I think that hot meals are important to build up morale, friendship and culture ties”, he said.

SGarangan


#DUYOGMARAWI BULLETIN

1. Provided 7,759 Halal Meals (for Iftar) to Marawi Evacuees in 4 Barangays in Iligan City in partnership with ARMK (ongoing)

2. Provided 100 temporary sleeping mats 47 malong to IDPs in Baraas, Iligan City in partnershipwith Mercury Drugs and Trademore Marketing (May 27, 2017)

3. Conducted Psycososial sessions to 28 individuals in Saray, Iligan City ( May 27, June 5, June 7);

4.) Distributed non-food items in Baraas, Iligan City in partnership with Concerned MSU Faculty and Students (May 28)

5.) Distributed food items and hygiene kits to 28 families in Saray, Iligan City in partnership with Friends from Aloran, ESSF and Anonymous Donors (June 5)

—#DuyogMarawi updates from May 27 to June 5, 2017—-

* * *

#DUYOGSURIGAO BULLETIN

1. Conducted DRR drill simulation to 1 of the 3 target barangays in San Francisco, Surigao del Norte (on going).

2. Conducted courtesy call and coordination meetings to LGUs and line agencies in San Francisco, Surigao del Norte.

3. Conducted Psychosocial Sessions to earthquake affected children and adults in Barangay Hondrado, Diaz and Poblacion in San Francisco, Surigao del Norte.

4. Distributed food items to 500 families from Barangay Hondrado, Diaz and Poblacion in San Francisco, Surigao del Norte.

—Updates as of June 12, 2017—


RDRRAC

RDRRAC as a network of NGO’s and PO’s in Lanao Provinces, aims to uplift the lives of the vulnerable IDPs through a comprehensive and integrated delivery of services which covers emergency responses, facilitation of emotional recovery, economic resiliency and rehabilitation while at the same time advocating peace.

On the other hand, coupled with the immediate needs of the IDPs are the violations of their human rights. They are more prone to harassment – physically & emotionally. In addition, human rights violations of the civilians particularly women and children are also rising. However, developmental workers attending to such problems of the IDPs are very few. It is in this context that RDRRAC integrated Human Rights Promotions and Protection in its programs and services. It aims to promote, protect and advocate human rights through paralegal services, education programs, in the tri-media and policy advocacy